Resume Discussion Hour: The Next Monster Twitter Chat

Our next Monster Twitter Chat is Thursday, February 16, at 6:00 p.m. Eastern /3:00 p.m. Pacific — the hashtag is #mwchat. Monster.com Senior Editor and Career Advice Expert Charles Purdy will spend an hour answering questions and discussing issues related to making your resume as good as it can be.

New to “Twitter chats”? They’re  easy! Follow the conversation on Twitter by following the stream of contents that are tagged #mwchat — you can ask questions for Charles, share your own expertise, or just follow along and get some great job-search advice.)

You can send your career questions in advance to @monstercareers on Twitter — use the #mwchat hashtag so we don’t miss them! — or leave a question in the Comments section below. We’ll see you there (and tell a friend!).

And if you want some great resume advice right now, check out these resume-advice articles written by Charles Purdy:

 

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  • http://Facebook--Monsterjobs Daniel Herth

    I am re-entering the business community after a 15yr absence. I had severe back issues that eventually led to a major surgery, and I am now disabled. At what point do I mention that I am disabled? And how do I account for the time out of the corporate arena while I was trouble shooting my back issues that finally led to a major surgery? Also, I am on pain medication, and will test positive for opiates when drug tested, how do I manage that situation? Even with meds, I am very lucid, and extremely able minded.

  • Charles Purdy

    The short answer is that you should discuss your disability only insofar as it might affect your ability to do your job — it if won’t, there not a compelling reason. When discussing the past 15 years, stay positive and focus on the other things you have been doing to stay current and abreast of developments in your industry — even if it’s just books you read, industry groups you stayed active in, and that sort of thing.

    Here are several articles that might help you further:

    http://career-advice.monster.com/resumes-cover-letters/resume-writing-tips/Disclose-Disability-on-Resume/article.aspx

    http://career-advice.monster.com/job-search/getting-started/Job-Hunting-with-a-Disability/article.aspx

    http://career-advice.monster.com/job-interview/interview-preparation/interview-confidence-for-workers-wi/article.aspx

  • Laurel

    I am 56, very well qualified exec assistant with accounting/financial, graphic design/website/blog, customer service background and have been paid accordingly.

    I have sent out at least 300 resumes in past 3 months, have only had about 5-6 interviews, no offers.

    Got a lot of “we’re hiring in 2-3 months and wanted to see what the market has”.

    I don’t know if that line is an age-excuse, a legit answer or if I’m asking too much for my area. Any way to ‘feel them out’ and see if I can get an answer?

  • monsterstaff

    Short answer: When a company tells you to check back in two months, you can check back in two months — and keep checking. I’d assume it’s a legitimate answer.

    If you are concerned about your salary requirements being too high, you can do some research into what is standard in your area for someone with your background (sites like PayScale.com may be a good place to start).

    But I’m struck by the fact that you’re sending out more than three resumes a day, and I wonder if that might be a place where you can change how you’re going about applying for work. That’s a lot of focus on applying for jobs, which doesn’t leave a lot of time for other important job-search activities like research, resume/application customization, networking, professional development, and similar activities.

    In your shoes, I might think about looking at my job-search strategy and finding ways to work those important things into my schedule, too. I’ve provided some links to articles with ideas about stepping out of your job-search “comfort zone.”

    http://career-advice.monster.com/job-search/getting-started/10-ways-to-make-jobhunting-your-fulltime-job-hot-jobs/article.aspx?WT.mc_n=SM_PR_Blog_monstercareers

    http://career-advice.monster.com/job-search/getting-started/job-search-rules-to-break/article.aspx?WT.mc_n=SM_PR_Blog_monstercareers

    http://career-advice.monster.com/job-search/getting-started/fight-job-search-ageism/article.aspx?WT.mc_n=SM_PR_Blog_monstercareers

    Hope that’s helpful, and best of luck in your job search.

  • Cathrina

    Hello and Hafa Adai Job Seekers,

    I have also been following jobs that are relevant to my work and also did find interesting information about the things I did include that did was not my primary job experience. Because I have tried several things. Having to pick and chose a career is major challenge but indeed I am not afraid to step outside of the box. For those who have been employed for over 15-25 years, my instinct stays stay put for now. If you love what your doing hang in there, what I would rather do is seek a another part time job so that way it helps me along the way. One job for single parents is really frustrating because we are the primary bread winners. No one else is there not even our teens if you know what I mean. Every financial obligation is important but in any case if we have to give up eating out each week we you will have to cut down of give it up. If wants is what your dealing with. Cut Cut Cut.

  • Les Gregor

    Was copychief , creative director & TV writer/producer for major national agencies over a 12 yr. period. The for some 15 years operated Gregor Communications Inc. in Montreal providing copy and art services in all media. I am also a proven jingle composer and song- smith with royalty earnings from participation in an RCA album.?

    Getting a little bored with sort-of-retired status and looking to flex my creative “stuff”.

    Suggestions?