5 for Friday: Job Search Morale Edition

It can be very tempting when unemployed to hide in your house and search online for a job 24/7. It can be stressful and embarrassing to admit to others that you lost your job and so you become somewhat antisocial. But you have to fight that urge. Not only will you be missing out on support from your friends and family, you’ll be missing networking opportunities   Here are 5 articles with suggestions for how to keep your morale up during your job search.

  • Nine Things You Should and Shouldn’t Do If You Lose Your Job. Lifehacker: “Blogger Penelope Trunk recommends spending unemployment time “creating projects for yourself and executing on them. It’s good for you mentally,” she says, “because you are doing something meaningful with your time and that will keep your spirits up.” If you’re feeling sorry for yourself, volunteering can also boost your mood by putting your situation in perspective.”
  • 6 Tips For Dating While You’re Unemployed. Careerealism: “Being honest about your unemployment is the best approach to communicating with a new guy [or girl],” said dating expert Marni Battista. That doesn’t mean you have to be negative about it, though. Battista suggests putting a positive spin on your situation. For instance, rather than talking about how the economy is killing your industry, or how hiring folks just don’t “get you,” focus on what’s working. Here’s an example: “I love being a teacher, and am confident that my expertise in integrating technology into the classroom is going to land me an amazing position. All the interviews are great opportunities to practice and discover what the marketplace is looking for. [W]hen you cast blame on life’s circumstances, it leaks a ‘Debbie Downer’ energy to your date and he [or she] will be more turned off by your negativity rather than the fact that you are unemployed,” said Battista.”
  • 4 Selfish Reasons to Volunteer During Your Job Hunt. Business Insider: “Even if no jobs are available when you hop on board as a volunteer, something could always change. Someone might leave for another job, the non-profit could receive extra funding to hire a new employee or temporary help might be needed when a new mother takes her maternity leave. When these situations happen, people with the power to hire will likely want to interview someone who’s already familiar with internal processes and has demonstrated a passion for the organization’s mission—someone like a volunteer.”
  • How to be Unemployed (Without Going Crazy). Refinery 29: “Lower Your Stress: Walk. Seriously. Exercise will help regulate your hormones and get rid of all that bottled-up emotion and worry about your future (or your next meal). Penman stresses: “This is the simplest lifestyle change that you can make to increase happiness. You don’t need to walk in the wilderness or even in the park. A stroll down Fifth Avenue at 5 p.m. can be just as magical.” If you’re ready to get super zen, you can give meditation a shot — it may seem too crunchy for you, but it can have unbelievable results on your psyche. According to Penman, the simplest way to relieve symptoms of acute anxiety or stress (think a racing heart, shortness of breath, and all that other stuff you feel when watching a Ryan Gosling flick) is to close your eyes and focus on your breath. Om.”
  • Keeping Positive While Job Searching Aides In Success. Quick News Now: “While the job search process can be long and exhausting, a University of Missouri researcher has found that maintaining positivity and staying motivated can lead to a more successful job search. Turban’s study focused on college seniors who were currently in the job search process and measured their positive and negative affectivity during the search. Positive and negative affectivity are individual characteristics that influence how an individual sees or perceives the world. Turban said that affectivity is believed to influence perceptions and thoughts about the job search as well.

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